ESP8266 internet radio

ESP8266 radio station

Tom Tobback built an ESP8266 internet radio based off Edzelf’s excellent Esp-radio project. It uses NodeMCU ESP8266 board for connecting to various internet radio stations and the VS1053 module for decoding the mp3 stream. A TFT display is used in the project to show relevant information such as which radio station is being played. The firmware for ESP8266 is developed using Arduino IDE. The radio also features a built-in web server to allow the user to configure settings and add/modify favorite radio stations. The radio box has a volume control knob and 2 push buttons for channel up and down functions.

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Arduino guitar pedal

Arduino guitar pedal

This Arduino-based multi-effect guitar pedal is an open source design for guitarists and hackers. The design is made simple and customizable so that you can program it to make your own effect without an in-depth knowledge of digital signal processing. The project is Open Source & Open Hardware and aimed for guitarists, hackers and programmers that want to learn about digital signal processing, effects, synthesizers and experiment without deep knowledge on DSP, electronics or hardcore programming.

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Flexible smartwatch using e-ink display

Flexible smartwatch using e-ink display

Nick Ames aims to build a thin and flexible smartwatch with a wrap-around touchscreen display made of a 4.9″, 720×120 EPD (e-ink) screen. Besides time telling, the smartphone also features health sensors to count your steps and monitor pulse rate and blood oxygen level. This is also Nick’s official entry to Hackaday 2017 contest. Check out his project page for more details on it.  

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Making a self-balancing robot using Arduino

Self-balancing robot

Two-wheel self-balancing robots are pretty cool and could be challenging to make for beginners. Joop Brokking describes the build process of his amazingly stable self-balancing robot in a video tutorial posted below. The robot uses two stepper motors for precise motion that is controlled by an Arduino board. The angular inclinations data are derived using a MPU6050 gyro/accelerometer. You can download the design files and firmware from Joop’s website. Joop’s YouTube video tutorial is posted below:

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Portable power supply with built-in batteries

Computer controlled power supply

Most of the bench power supplies we use derive power from the main AC supply. ThomasVDD presents his Arduino-controlled smart power supply with built-in battery backup so that you can use it anywhere without an AC outlet. It not only delivers precise output, but is also controllable via PC over an USB port. Key Features Constant voltage and constant current modes Uses a low noise linear regulator, preceded by a tracking preregulator to minimize power dissipation Use of handsolderable components to keep the project accessible Powered by ATMEGA328P, programmed with Arduino IDE PC communication via Java application over micro USB Powered

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